1) The face of humanity, Tuesday, September 28, 2010, from the Guardian Photos of The Day:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/gallery/2010/sep/28/24-hours-in-pictures#/?picture=367112859&index=0

Kabul, Afghanistan: A man with his bicycle passes children playing among discarded vehicles in the ruins of the Jangalak industrial complex.

 

Delhi, India: Workers rest in the shade outside the Jawaharlal Nehru stadium prior to the Commonwealth Games.

 

Taipei, Taiwan: Officials dressed as ancient Chinese scholars perform a traditional ritual.

 

Hebron, West Bank: Ultra-Orthodox Jews pray at the Tomb of the Patriarchs, also known as the Ibrahim Mosque, a shrine that is holy to Muslims and Jews. 

2) Warning, a bit of a rant about inhumanity in the deserts of Arizona

From an article in the New York Times, by Marc Lacey:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/27/us/27water.html?_r=2&ref=global-home

“Two years ago, Daniel J. Millis was ticketed for littering after he was caught by a federal Fish and Wildlife officer placing gallon jugs of water for passing immigrants in the brush of this 118,000-acre preserve.

Mr. Millis, 31, was not the only one to get a ticket. Fourteen other volunteers for Tucson-based organizations that provide aid to immigrants crossing from Mexico to the United States were similarly cited. Most of the cases were later dropped, but Mr. Millis and another volunteer for a religious group called No More Deaths were convicted of defacing the refuge with their water jug drops.

The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit weighed in on Mr. Millis’s appeal this month, ruling that it was “ambiguous as to whether purified water in a sealed bottle intended for human consumption meets the definition of ‘garbage.’ ” Voting 2-to-1, a three-judge panel overturned Mr. Millis’s conviction.

The issue remains far from settled, though. The court ruled that Mr. Millis probably could have been charged under a different statute, something other than littering. And the Fish and Wildlife Services continues to forbid anyone to leave gallon jugs of water in the refuge — a policy backed by this state’s immigration hardliners, who say comforting immigrants will only encourage them to cross.

From 2002 to 2009, 25 illegal immigrants died while passing through the refuge’s rolling hills, which are flanked by mountains and are home to pronghorns, coyotes, rattlesnakes and four different kinds of skunks. Throughout southern Arizona, the death toll totaled 1,715 from 2002 to 2009, with this year’s hot temperatures putting deaths at a record-breaking pace.”

I can understand why, with unemployment so high, many are calling for stronger measures to stop illegal immigration.  I can’t understand how some are willing to let people die in the desert.  How giving water, and medical help, to those we who are dying can ever be wrong.

I guess in Arizona it’s alright to litter the desert with died bodies, but not water bottles to save their lives.

The No More Deaths site :

http://www.nomoredeaths.org/

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