1) Weekend pictures from the Net:

Charmey, Switzerland: Swiss farmers guide traditionally decorated cows during the so-called Desalpe, the annual procession when cows are led back to the plain at the beginning of autumn after grazing during the summer months on mountain pastures

Khagendra Thapa, the world’s shortest man, at 1’10”, stands with Miss Nepal beauty pageant winners during a news conference in Kathmandu on Friday. The Nepal Tourism Board has nominated Thapa and Miss Nepal beauty pageant winners as goodwill ambassadors to promote tourism in Nepal.

Tourists climb the Singing Sand Dunes near the Crescent Moon Spring on July 20, 2010 in Jiuquan of Gansu Province China. The Crescent Moon Spring, named after its unique moon-like shape, is located at the north foot of the Singing Sand Dunes, about 50 meters (164 feet) from north to south and 5 meters (16 feet) deep on an average.

2) Why don’t Americans eat more vegetables?

I do now eat more vegetables than I use to, it only took becoming a diabetic.  I had to get sick to get healthy.

Besides obvious questions of health, how much money would we save in health-care cost if we just changed our diets.  The fact that most of us don’t have healthy lifestyles may be the biggest reason for our soaring health cost .  Of course we will blame everyone else but ourselves.

From a New York Times article on the subject:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/25/health/policy/25vegetables.html?hpw

“This month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a comprehensive nationwide behavioral study of fruit and vegetable consumption. Only 26 percent of the nation’s adults eat vegetables three or more times a day, it concluded. (And no, that does not include French fries.) ”

“This week, the company released the 25th edition of its annual report, “Eating Patterns in America.” The news there wasn’t good, either. For example, only 23 percent of meals include a vegetable, Mr. Balzer said. (Again, fries don’t count, but lettuce on a hamburger does.) The number of dinners prepared at home that included a salad was 17 percent; in 1994, it was 22 percent.”

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