1) My two favorite pictures from my Tuesday wanderings around the Net.

Srinagar, India: A Kashmiri boy looks at a rainbow above Babdemb lake.

From today’s Guardian’s Dog Photographer of the Year candidates.

When is the last time you saw a rainbow?

2) Stuff you can not make up.

They sell everything on EBAY, including a witch’s spell for “Enhancing your booty”.  For just $8.95 Amelia, a “very powerful Wiccan Witch”, will cast a spell that is guaranteed to “help you develop that sexy, curvy booty you always wanted”. 

From the EBAY posting:

“Greetings my name is Amelia.  I have been a spellcaster for 20+ years.  All spells are cast by me, sometimes  with the assistance of my Coven.  My spells are strong and very effective.  Upon purchase of a spell I will set up an alter solely for your spell to be cast.  Be assured your desired outcome will receive my undivided attention.   This will include the use of candles, herbs, oils, gemstones, tools and some other items that may be required to bring results.  Your spell will be complete within 24 – 48 hours of purchase depending on the complexity of your spell.  I will send you a confirmation upon completion via ebay message.  You can expect to feel positive energy immediately that will increase in strength daily.  Some of my clients say they experience a tingly sensation while I cast the spell.”

It don’t know if it is more funny or sad that she has sold 22, so far.

Have you ever, for fun, had your fortune told?

3) Chai Ling was a leader of the 1989 student uprising at Tiananmen Square. Now she wants to help women and girls in her native China.  Ling became the second-most-wanted person in China after the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989. She escaped to Hong Kong, then made her way to the US in 1990. Today she’s a businesswoman as well as a wife and mother of three.

Ling converted to Christianity in April, a process that she says renewed her life. “I thought I’d found a solution to China’s problems by studying the democratic model of Taiwan.” “It turns out God gave me a new calling instead – to help China’s women and girls,”

Her new humanitarian venture, a nonprofit group called All Girls Allowed (www.allgirlsallowed.org), aims to provide legal aid, counseling, and other assistance to victims of forced abortions and sterilizations in China.

From a Christian Science Monitor story about her:

 

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Society/2010/0816/Protecting-women-and-girls-in-China-where-one-child-per-family-is-the-rule-and-a-boy-the-preference

“Twenty-one years ago, Chai Ling was a student leader of the 1989 Tiananmen Square demonstration, speaking out against China’s oppressive regime.

Lauded as their “commander in chief” by the democratic activists protesting at the vast Beijing public square, Ms. Chai was later denounced by the Chinese government as the second-most-wanted “culprit” of the political upheaval and forced to flee her native land. Hiding in a boat, she first reached Hong Kong and later settled in the United States in 1990.

Today Chai is a savvy businesswoman living near Boston and a mother of three, after marriage to an American citizen.

On June 3, the eve of the 21st anniversary of the Tiananmen bloodshed, she spoke at a church in Falls Church, Va. “[The] Tiananmen massacre is still happening every day!” she said as tears streamed down her face and her agitated hands whipped the balmy night air.

Chai was referring to China’s one-child policy, in which officials force pregnant women to abort their babies. In place since 1979, the “one child” rule has prompted many Chinese to practice sex selection, using ultrasound screenings to determine whether the fetus is a boy or girl and then aborting females or abandoning them after birth to orphanages. More than 35,000 forced abortions were performed in China each day in 2009, Chai says – a death toll that far exceeds the estimated thousands of protesters who died in the 1989 massacre.

 Chai now has begun a new humanitarian venture, a nonprofit group called All Girls Allowed (www.allgirlsallowed.org), which aims to provide legal aid, counseling, and other assistance to victims of forced abortions and sterilizations in China. She also plans to launch a campaign to change minds in China about the preference for male offspring and build orphanages.”

“Chai’s audience in the Virginia church looked on in horror as she screened a slide show filled with photos taken in secret at China’s squalid abortion clinics and detention centers, where disheveled pregnant women sobbed.

Chai said the idea of the charity project stemmed from her assignment last fall as an interpreter at a congressional hearing on China’s one-child policy, where an abused Chinese woman testified.

Shrouding her face with a black veil (for fear of retribution), a soft-spoken woman with the pseudonym Jian Wu recounted how she was tortured by officials in her town. Ms. Wu, carrying her second child, came out from hiding after her father was severely beaten by authorities. She was dragged to an abortion clinic.

“Her [Wu’s] only crime was being a mother,” Chai says.

Now herself a mother of three girls, ages 5, 7, and 9, Chai is using seed money from the Jenzabar Foundation, the charitable arm of her fledging software business, to drive her human rights endeavor. She is partnering with and funding local women’s rights groups in China. One day, she hopes to change the minds of China’s birth control officials.”

“Chai converted to Christianity in April, a process that she says renewed her life.

 “I thought I found a solution to China’s problems by studying the democratic model of Taiwan,” says Chai of the research she did in earning a master’s degree in international relations at Princeton University in New Jersey.

“It turns out God gave me a new calling instead – to help China’s women and girls,” Chai now says”

Advertisements