I found these interesting articles in the news I thought I would share.

1) Some funny lines in the comic strips:

“For some marriage isn’t a period in life, it’s a sentence.”

 “For some marrying a free spirit turns out to be very expensive.”

“Why do we need Stainless Steel Cleaner? If it’s stainless why would we need a cleaner?”

“Father to son, “You’re a little late coming home from school.”  Son,”I’ve been to Compulsory Opportunity Sessions designed to redirect my behavior to success.” (Detention – my favorite class) Father, “Keep up the good work.”

Question – How well behaved were you in school. 

In class I was actually pretty quiet.  Except for driving the teachers crazy with questions.  That is when I made to class.  About once a week I sought my education in the great outdoors.  I missed over 30 days of school my senior year in high school.    

I was on my own a lot.  My father worked 7 days a week to pay the bills.  My mother was sick and in the hospital much of the time.  

2) Northwestern University researchers have developed a new nanoscopic material that enables cartilage to do what it doesn’t do naturally, grow.

http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2010/02/cartilage.html 

“Northwestern University researchers are the first to design a bioactive nanomaterial that promotes the growth of new cartilage in vivo and without the use of expensive growth factors. Minimally invasive, the therapy activates the bone marrow stem cells and produces natural cartilage. No conventional therapy can do this.

“Our material of nanoscopic fibers stimulates stem cells present in bone marrow to produce cartilage containing type II collagen and repair the damaged joint,” Shah said. “A procedure called microfracture is the most common technique currently used by doctors, but it tends to produce a cartilage having predominantly type I collagen which is more like scar tissue.”

The Northwestern gel is injected as a liquid to the area of the damaged joint, where it then self-assembles and forms a solid. This extracellular matrix, which mimics what cells usually see, binds by molecular design one of the most important growth factors for the repair and regeneration of cartilage. By keeping the growth factor concentrated and localized, the cartilage cells have the opportunity to regenerate.”

3) In travel news one theme park I need to visit. China’s “Chocolate Wonderland”, boasts chocolate model of the Great Wall.

 

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pacific/2010/0129/A-new-world-wonder-China-s-Great-Wall-remade-in-tons-of-chocolate

“What do you do with empty Olympic facilities to try to make them useful once the Games are over?  Why, open a World Chocolate Wonderland, of course.

That’s what the Chinese have done. In a hangar-like building next to the Bird’s Nest a team of innovative chocolatiers have taken 80 tons of Belgian chocolate and turned it into replicas of the Great Wall, the famed terracotta warriors, and even more unlikely icons, such as a Louis Vuitton handbag.

The show opened Friday, and organizers say they expect as many as 1 million visitors over the next 10 weeks to pay a hefty $12 each to marvel at what they call “a combination of Chinese tradition and chocolate creativity.”

4) The Humane Society came up with a great re-cycling idea.  Turn in you old fur coat to help cloth an orphaned animal, Coats For Cubs.

http://www.hsus.org/furfree/campaigns/c4c/

“The furs are cut into an appropriate size for the animal, whether it be a bobcat, fox, raccoon, squirrel, or rabbit, and placed inside the animal’s enclosure. The furry blanket becomes a surrogate mother to orphaned animals, reducing stress and giving comfort.

One rehabilitator related a story about a restless orphaned river otter who chirped constantly. Once she was given a fur blanket, she settled right down. Turning the sleeve of a fur coat inside out, a rehabilitator can also create a warm nest for a burrowing animal such as an opossum. Some animals adopt a piece of fur as a playmate, jumping on it and wrestling with it.”

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